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Perseids meteor shower


Who can see it: Given clear weather and dark skies, the Perseid meteor shower can be seen by most of the world, though it is best viewed by observers in the Northern Hemisphere. In the Southern Hemisphere, the Perseid radiant doesn’t climb very high above the horizon or isn’t visible at all. So Southern Hemisphere observers will see fewer Perseids than their northern counterparts. Places where the Perseid radiant isn’t visible include the southern parts of Australia, Africa, and South America, and all of Antarctica. Where to look: If it’s not cloudy, get as far away from bright lights as you can, lay on your back and look up. Put the horizon at the edge of your peripheral vision as you let the sky and stars fill your field of view. Give your eyes some time to adjust to the dark and you should start seeing Perseids. No binoculars or telescopes are necessary!”
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jazzdaleksarchive)

everyendeavor:

Perseids meteor shower

Who can see it: Given clear weather and dark skies, the Perseid meteor shower can be seen by most of the world, though it is best viewed by observers in the Northern Hemisphere. In the Southern Hemisphere, the Perseid radiant doesn’t climb very high above the horizon or isn’t visible at all. So Southern Hemisphere observers will see fewer Perseids than their northern counterparts. Places where the Perseid radiant isn’t visible include the southern parts of Australia, Africa, and South America, and all of Antarctica. 

Where to look: If it’s not cloudy, get as far away from bright lights as you can, lay on your back and look up. Put the horizon at the edge of your peripheral vision as you let the sky and stars fill your field of view. Give your eyes some time to adjust to the dark and you should start seeing Perseids. No binoculars or telescopes are necessary!”

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